Issues in Adolescence

/Issues in Adolescence

Here we write about problems teenagers face in navigating through this period of ‘storm and stress’. Adolescents need to deal with a lot of physical and psychological changes. Puberty, growing academic stress, peer pressure, changes in the parent-child relationship and the struggle towards identity formation can sometimes create emotional stress, anger and anxiety in teenagers.The blogs here describe healthy ways of dealing with these emotions in order to make the challenges adolescence a means of developing inner strength and resilience

BODY IMAGE ISSUES IN ADOLESCENCE: HOW CAN YOU DEVELOP A POSITIVE BODY IMAGE?

Body Image is what you think and feel about your physical self or your body. As you enter adolescence, "body image" takes center stage and you will have days when you start to feel awkward and uncomfortable in your body. This article introduces you to a healthier and more positive way of looking at yourself and your body.

By | September 25th, 2014|Issues in Adolescence|2 Comments

COULD SOCIAL MEDIA PLAY A POSITIVE ROLE IN YOUR TEENAGER’S LIFE?

One of the major concerns that most parents today have is the prominence of social media and instant messaging in their teenager’s daily routine. Parents are genuinely worried that their promising teenager will neglect studies, household activities and while his time away. As psychologists, we understand your concerns. However, despite the much talked about adverse effects of social media, there is also some good news.

By | April 16th, 2014|Issues in Adolescence|0 Comments

CYBERBULLYING IN TEENAGERS : IS IT HAPPENING TO YOU?

R.M. is a cheerful 14 year old teenager who stays with her parents in Mumbai. She likes science and finds history very boring. She loves watching movies and spending time with her friends. She sounds just like you or someone you might know, doesn’t she? Just like you, she has a profile on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram…you name it! And just like you, she can’t wait to get home from class and come online to update her status; chat with her friends or post a comment about something funny that happened at school. Since the past week however, she has been behaving differently. Last week, when she got home from school and signed into Facebook, a classmate had commented something in jest on her picture. It was funny at first, but then the comments got mean, and extremely hurtful. The same person from her class, then started posting mean status updates and sending her unkind messages. She didn’t know what to do or how to make it stop. So, she hasn’t gone to school for most days of the week saying she’s feeling unwell. She’s been withdrawn and her parents can’t understand what happened. She has been avoiding messages from her friends. She feels hurt, scared and even a little angry. Wouldn’t you feel the same way?

By | July 27th, 2013|Issues in Adolescence|0 Comments

UNDERSTAND TEENAGE SUICIDE: GET INTO THEIR SHOES

A classmate of mine in school and college successfully hung herself from a fan... It was devastating... Years later here I am-a psychologist- with several hundred sessions of having heard the teenagers side of the story-the hopelessness, helplessness and the frustrations. When Rediff asked me to write about teenage suicide, everything came together :)

By | September 11th, 2012|Issues in Adolescence|2 Comments

COMMUNICATING WHEN YOU ARE ANGRY: TIPS FOR TEENAGERS

If you find yourself getting angry and irritated easily and are ready to ‘give it back’ most of the time, you are also probably quite bottled up inside. Few people seem to understand you and most brand you as an ‘angry teen’. You may have tried ‘controlling your anger’ and ‘being less angry’ but may not have succeeded to your satisfaction (and those of others). Often, what we do to manage aggression is try “not to get angry” even when we are actually angered. Think about it. It’s like mom is repeatedly saying something to you, you’re fuming within but try to “be calm” and mask your anger. No wonder then that you end up snapping or yelling at her despite not wanting to. What we actually doing here is ‘controlling’ or attempting to suppress our anger. It’s like trying to shut an overstuffed suitcase. Suppression is never healthy, it only breeds sadness, frustration and makes us feel that the people around us are unfair.

By | May 3rd, 2012|Issues in Adolescence|2 Comments

MANAGING ANGER: GUIDANCE FOR ADOLESCENTS

Some of us in our teens are ‘cool under pressure’, ‘cool as a cucumber’ or ‘chilled out’. Some of us are hot-tempered, short-tempered or easily angered. If you are one of those who identify with the second set of descriptors, life could get a tad bit difficult. Losing one’s cool is never a pleasant feeling. You may get persistently described as short-tempered, stubborn and argumentative. Moreover, over a period of time, others almost stop bothering to find out why you are angry and what has hurt you. Its almost like, ‘this chap/girl is forever angry so forget it.’ At such a time it may start to feel like people are just mocking you or they just don’t care….and wait, its not over yet.

By | April 6th, 2012|Issues in Adolescence|2 Comments

THE IMPORTANCE OF TRADITIONAL PLAY

Play. A word that is synonymous with setting the mind free, using imagination and almost creating a new world. However, today, we are increasingly turning to electronic games to fill in most of our play time. Video games and the like are certainly entertaining and stimulating. With advanced technology and thrilling effects, they sure give us an adrenaline rush! However, forms of conventional or traditional play can also offer us a number of psychological benefits in addition to physical benefits. We could be missing out on a world of good that our good old indoor board games, outdoor games and imaginative play could do to us. Wonder how? Let’s explore.

By | November 24th, 2011|Issues in Adolescence|0 Comments

DEALING WITH JEALOUSY IN FRIENDSHIP

Jealousy is a difficult emotion to deal with. It becomes that much more difficult however; when we’re jealous of a close friend, who we also love. Two opposite emotions – affection and jealousy clash…and perhaps leave us agonized. The closer we are to the friend, the worse it could get. Every time we meet the friend, we’re reminded of how he/ she is better than we are…and how we are not good enough. Leaving the situation unaddressed could prove detrimental to the friendship, to our emotional well being or to both

By | August 2nd, 2011|Issues in Adolescence|0 Comments